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Archive for category: Original Posts

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What is Hygee and How Can it Help You Survive Winter?

Hygee (pronounced hue-guh) defined as, a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being (regarded as a defining characteristic of Danish culture), is becoming very popular.  Its basic principles revolve around creating an environment that is comfortable, full of love, warm, and cozy – sounds like a great way to make it through a cold Canadian winter if you ask me!  Learn more about Hygee and its benefits in the following care of HealthLine.

HealthLine:  What the Heck Is Hygge and Why Do You Need Some This Winter?

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O-Tip of the Week: Give Yourself a Pat on the Back

Our O-Tip of the week series we will be providing valuable “OT-Approved Life Hacks” to provide you with simple and helpful solutions for living. 

For the month of February, our O-Tip of the week series will talk about Self-Esteem, which is defined as confidence or belief in one’s own worth or abilities.  Self-esteem issues affect more than just teenagers and encompass more than physical insecurities.  Follow along this February to learn more about self-esteem, its importance and some simple ways give yourself a boost! 

This week we invite you to reflect on and record your accomplishments.  Big or small, past or present, make a list of all the things you have achieved and refer to this when you are feeling down or need a boost. 

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What’s Your Love Language… And Why Does it Matter?

Julie Entwistle, MBA, BHSc (OT), BSc (Health / Gerontology)

I have a few online Goddesses I follow.  Women entrepreneurs who have built an empire educating other women on how to be successful.  Much like my own blog, they are comfortable sharing their stories of success and failure and want others to benefit from the knowledge they have.

In watching my online videos I will occasionally stumble upon a gem.  A piece of knowledge, a book to read, a way of thinking, or an exercise that truly moves me forward.  I recently had one of those experiences.

The video, by my career-crush and woman with the best hair in the world Marie Forleo (www.marieforleo.com), was on ways to appreciate and be appreciated.  Be it your spouse, children, parents or colleagues at work, we all strive to be loved and appreciated by those that matter to us, and to demonstrate this in return.  Marie was suggesting that in work and life it is helpful to understand how people experience and interpret love and appreciation so the efforts you make towards them can truly have an impact.  While a bit unorthodox, her suggestion was to engage people in the test of their Love Language.  She mentioned that this really helped her and her team know how to work together and ultimately appreciate each other best.  So, I took the test.  And my husband took the test.  And my children.  And my team.  The results were fascinating and helpful.

In my own family, our languages are different.  Personally, I appreciate it most when people take things off my plate.  My mind is a web of things to do so one less thing to think about is hugely valuable and appreciated by me.  Be it “I grabbed the kitty litter, put that envelope in the mail, or will send that email” – it resonates and helps me feel loved.  And call me cold, but I don’t resonate with physical touch (recall MC Hammer “Can’t Touch This”).

My girls are all different.  While most of them ranked “quality time” as their # 1, some prefer “words of affirmation” and one “physical touch”.  Not surprising, my physical touch kid is the one that is always asking for hugs and snuggling up to me on the couch.  Of great interest to me was that the one whose highest score was “words of affirmation” is also the kid that has a really hard time with conversations about things she did wrong or ways she let us down.  That makes sense now as people with this love language “thrive on hearing kind and encouraging words” and can be “shattered by insults”.  While we would never intentionally insult her, indicating that her school work is sloppy will make her feel unloved.  Good to know.  After we took the test and talked about it as a family, I took all of our ratings and put these in a chart by the door where we come and go.  I wanted these to be in plain sight and a regular reminder that our Love Languages are different and this matters when we want or need to be loved and appreciated by one another.  In a chaotic family of 6, this understanding is essential.

So I then took this experience a step further.  I asked the very important women I work with to also take this test.  The results again were interesting.  While my business partner and I tend to use small gifts as a way to show them appreciation, none of them ranked this as important.  Most would rather have unsolicited compliments (“words of affirmation”) then a surprise Edible Arrangement.  Some also prefer “acts of service” or being given “quality time” to feel valued.  At work, we can easily implement appreciation actions by offering to help them complete a burdensome task, providing unsolicited compliments, or making sure they have our undivided attention when they need it.

I consider the masterpiece that is myself to be always “under construction” and as such, I am repeatedly interested in ways to be better, do better, and spread love.  Love does not need to be considered romantic and according to 5 Love Languages, can be cast over all we meet with through simple gestures, kind words, a pat on the back, a small token of appreciation, or by sparing some time from a packed schedule.  Take the test here and see how you interpret love and appreciation and share that knowledge with those around you.

 

Originally posted July 2015

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O-Tip of the Week: Life’s too Short to Keep Up with the Jones

Our O-Tip of the week series we will be providing valuable “OT-Approved Life Hacks” to provide you with simple and helpful solutions for living. 

For the month of February, our O-Tip of the week series will talk about Self-Esteem, which is defined as confidence or belief in one’s own worth or abilities.  Self-esteem issues affect more than just teenagers and encompass more than physical insecurities.  Follow along this February to learn more about self-esteem, its importance and some simple ways give your self a boost! 

One way you can harm your self-esteem is through constant comparison of yourself to others.  However, putting a stop to this is, in fact, a difficult ask – magazines, tv shows, movies, social media… all of these things serve as channels to fill your mind with false images of how you “should be.”  Check out this great article care of Psychology Today which provides some great ways to get you to stop comparing yourself to others and see the amazingness within!

Psychology Today:  How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others

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How Anxiety and Depression Can Impact Cognition

Julie Entwistle, MBA, BHSc (OT), BSc (Health / Gerontology)
Co-written with Ashley Carnegie, Occupational Therapist

As a student working with an Occupational Therapist in the community, I realized early in my placement that many clients struggle with anxiety and depression in combination with cognitive challenges like decreased attention, concentration and focus, difficulties with memory, and slower information processing abilities. This spiked my interest, as I was unaware of the possible impact anxiety and depression could have on cognition and how these symptoms could be related.  I decided to look into this further, and am sharing my findings below.

Occupational Therapists work in a wide variety of settings including the community. As the hospitals become less and less able to accommodate people long-term, community-based occupational therapy services are becoming more and more common. Working in the community allows occupational therapists to reach a wide variety of clients, and therapists utilize a strength-based approach to build on the client’s current strengths to promote wellness and productivity.

Depression and anxiety are the most common types of mental illness throughout the world, including Canada. From my community placement experience as a student Occupational Therapist, I have found that the majority of the clients I have seen are experiencing depression and/or anxiety, often in combination with other primary diagnoses.

Interestingly, depression and anxiety can negatively impact the way the brain thinks, learns, and processes information and thus how it functions.  However, the relationship is complicated as a decrease in cognition may also lead to an increase in depression and/or anxiety which can then perpetuate the cycle.

Research has highlighted how anxiety and depression can negatively impact several aspects of cognition including:

  • Psychomotor speed
  • Attention
  • Executive functioning
  • Problem-solving
  • Attentional switching
  • Cognitive flexibility
  • Visual learning
  • Memory

The result for most people tends to be poor functional outcomes in their daily lives. Additionally, the brain regions believed to be responsible for these functions have been shown to be abnormal in people that also suffer from anxiety and depression  (e.g. hippocampus, amygdala, temporal lobes, and prefrontal cortex). Decreased memory, slowed information processing, and issues with verbal communication can negatively impact multiple areas of people’s lives. This information demonstrates the importance of the need to detect and treat anxiety and depression as early as possible as well as the need for early cognitive interventions for clients with anxiety and depression.

As a student Occupational Therapist, I wanted to further investigate how Occupational Therapists can help. I found evidence that Occupational Therapists can help clients in reducing functional decline, while also reducing the probability of relapse by treating cognitive deficits. Occupational Therapist’s target these areas by teaching client’s cognitive remediation and compensation strategies during their interventions and treatment monitoring.

Examples of remediation interventions may include:

  • Retraining higher-level cognitive skills (e.g. strategy use, self-monitoring, self-correction, problem-solving, self-evaluation)
  • Education
  • Relaxation and stress management techniques to regain control
  • Divided attention training (e.g. learn tasks separately and then combine tasks)
  • Imagery
  • Rehearsal strategies

Examples of compensatory interventions may include:

  • Modifying the environment (e.g. dim lights, reduce distractions)
  • Altering the task, (e.g. use of rest breaks, breaking the task into smaller components, repetition of instructions)
  • Use of both internal and external cueing/reminders (e.g. use of mnemonics, post-it notes, organizers, applications)

With both, often, a cognitive behavioural approach is taken.  Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) works to change clients thought structure to allow positive mood change, enhance coping strategies/problem solving, and help challenge faulty beliefs.

Anxiety and depression are common and are known to negatively impact a person’s cognition.  Worsening cognition then can deteriorate anxiety and depression further.  Early intervention is key to break this cycle and to promote function and wellness.   Occupational therapists play a vital role in providing interventions for those with anxiety and/or depression by implementing interventions for these issues, as well as treating the common resulting cognitive deficits.  Both remediation and compensatory techniques are used, often through cognitive behavioral therapy.  If you, or someone you know, is struggling with anxiety or depression this may present as cognitive difficulty, or if cognitive issues are present, anxiety and depression may also surface.  Consider occupational therapy if you would like support and strategies to improve these symptoms and to reduce their effect on your daily life.

 

References:

1. Carrier, A., & Raymond, M. H. Community occupational therapy practice in Canada: A diverse and evolving practice.

2. McRae, L., O’Donnell, S., Loukine, L., Rancourt, N., & Pelletier, C. (2016). Report summary-Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Canada, 2016. Health promotion and chronic disease prevention in Canada: research, policy and practice, 36(12), 314.

3. Statistics Canada (2014) Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada (SLCDC). Retrieved from http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=5160

4. Lee, R. S., Hermens, D. F., Porter, M. A., & Redoblado-Hodge, M. A. (2012). A meta-analysis of cognitive deficits in first-episode major depressive disorder. Journal of affective disorders, 140(2), 113-124.

5. Jaeger, J., Berns, S., Uzelac, S., & Davis-Conway, S. (2006). Neurocognitive deficits and disability in major depressive disorder. Psychiatry research, 145(1), 39-48.

6. Bora, E., Fornito, A., Pantelis, C., & Yücel, M. (2012). Gray matter abnormalities in major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of voxel based morphometry studies. Journal of affective disorders, 138(1), 9-18.

7. Femenía, T., Gómez-Galán, M., Lindskog, M., & Magara, S. (2012). Dysfunctional hippocampal activity affects emotion and cognition in mood disorders. Brain research, 1476, 58-70.

8. Lorenzetti, V., Allen, N. B., Fornito, A., & Yücel, M. (2009). Structural brain abnormalities in major depressive disorder: a selective review of recent MRI studies. Journal of affective disorders, 117(1), 1-17.

9. Fleming, J. (2017). An occupational approach to cognitive rehabilitation. Workshop presented through the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, Toronto, ON.

10. Grieve, J. I., & Gnanasekaran, L. (2008). Intervention for Cognitive Impairments. Grieve, JI, & Gnanasekaran, L.(3rd ed. ed.). Neuropsychology for occupational therapists: cognition in occupational performance. Oxford. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell.

11. Haran, D. (2009). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression. The Israel journal of psychiatry and related sciences, 46, 269.

12. Knapp, P., & Beck, A. T. (2008). Cognitive therapy: foundations, conceptual models,  applications and research. Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, 30, s54-s64.

 

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Safe Ways for Seniors to Remain Active in the Winter

Winter has fully arrived in Ontario bringing with it freezing cold temperatures, icy surfaces and lots of snow!  If you don’t enjoy any of the these, that’s okay.  Though you may not be able to safely or comfortably enjoy the great outdoors there are still great ways to remain active during the Winter season.  The following care of the McMaster Option Aging Portal discusses some great ways for seniors to stay active without the dangers that can arise when trying to brave the elements.

McMaster Optimal Aging Portal:  Four ways to stay active this winter

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O-Tip of the Week: Out with the Old and In with the New

Our O-Tip of the week series delivers valuable “OT-Approved Life Hacks” to provide you with simple and helpful solutions for living. 

For the month of January, our O-Tip series will provide you with ways to kick bad habits and establish good ones.

A helpful way to put an end to a bad habit is by replacing it with a good one.  Out with the old habit and in with a new healthier one.  This printable worksheet (below) will help you identify up to 10 healthy things to do more of in place of something you should do less of.  Some examples include:

  • more physical activity, less screen time
  • more taking the stairs at work, less taking the elevator
  • more homecooked meals, less fast food

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Is the Goal of Achieving Work-Life Balance Stressing You Out?

What is your impression of work-life balance? Is your goal to create this ‘balanced lifestyle’ actually increasing your stress level?  A lot of people find work-life balance a completely unrealistic goal that is impossible to achieve. Many find life demands are simply keeping them too busy to take time to relax.

As we have discussed before, stress can cause heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and immunity issues. Statistics Canada says that 1 in 4 adults reported high stress in 2013, and high stress means that your mental and physical health are declining.

The good news is that this is preventable. We simply need to change how we define “work-life balance” and create plans that will help reduce stress based on our individual situations.  The following video from our OT-V (Occupational Therapy Video) series will help shed light on how to create a healthy balance without increasing stress or guilt if this balance is not achieved every day. 


Remember Occupational therapists know the evidence behind de-stressing, and which activities give you the most bang for your buck when you’re low on time.  Contact an OT if you need help de-stressing and creating balance in your life.